Foto: Dina Lucia Weiss
Foto: Dina Lucia Weiss

Zu Gast im Mai

17-05 | Philipp Röding

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16-12 | Jürgen Bauer

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Zu Gast im Oktober

16-10 | Didi Drobna

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16-09 | André Patten

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Zu Gast im Mai

16-05 | Valentin Moritz

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16-03 | Elias Hirschl

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Zu Gast im Februar

16-02 | Markus Mittmansgruber

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Die Winkekatzen von Hiroshima - 13

(...) 5, Maneki Neko

 

5a, The stray cat and the shop: The operator of an impoverished shop (or inn, tavern, temple, etc.) takes in a starving, stray cat despite barely having enough to feed himself. In gratitude, the cat takes up a station outside the establishment and beckons in new visitors, bringing prosperity as a reward to the charitable proprietor. Ever after, the "beckoning cat" has been a symbol of good luck for small business owners.

 

5b, The nobleman-warning cat: One day a luminary passed by a cat, which seemed to wave to him. Taking the cat's motion as a sign, the nobleman paused and went to it. Diverted from his journey, he realized that he had avoided a trap that had been laid for him just ahead. Since that time, cats have been considered wise and lucky spirits. Many Japanese shrines and homes include the figurine of a cat with one paw upraised as if waving, hence the origin of maneki-neko, often referred to as kami-neko in reference to the cat's kami or spirit. Depending on version, the story may cast the nobleman as one of various Japanese emperors, as well as historical characters such as Oda Nobunaga and the samurai Ii Naotaka.

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